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Light along the wall

March 16, 2010

Friends who were lucky enough to see the line of beacons being  lit all the way along Hadrian’s Wall this weekend described it as ‘inspiring’.

Those of us who couldn’t be there can catch a little bit of the atmosphere from the video – there’s some here at the BBC and more at the Illuminating Hadrian’s Wall website.

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5 comments

  1. Thanks for pointing out the BBC video. Did you see the related video on the theory that Hadrian’s Wall was first as timber structure built while the stone wall was being constructed? http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/england/8298875.stm

    I wonder what the local inhabitants made of all this construction going on?

    Mark


    • No, I hadn’t seen the timber wall theory – interesting, thank you.

      It’s hard to imagine the locals being thrilled by the arrival of the wall, isn’t it? At least, those people whose land must have been requisitioned, or who found a massive obstruction running across the middle of their farm.

      On the other hand, the arrival of all those salaried troops must have provided plenty of business opportunities for anyone with an entrepreneurial spirit…


  2. I saw some of the coverage…I’m with you, though…Imagine heading for a market town and finding THAT in your path!


  3. Hi Ruth
    We were there on the 13th. Well worth it and fantastic that a realtively low tech event could bring in so many people. The real question is what is the long term impact for the economy? Will more people travel to see the borders and can we develop a sustainable marketing plan around this?

    I have always been intrigued by the thought of the romans, soldiers, auxiliaries, families all these people from across the Roman empire ending up in Cumbria and Northumberland. They must have seemed truly exotic to the locals. Also they would have brought money with them and i suspect that before their arrival we had a barter economy.
    These things must have created great barriers between them and the locals, but these would eventually tumble down and goodness knows how many of them left descendents in this area.


    • Hi Colin,

      I’m jealous! It was a brilliant idea – hopefully with a positive long-term outcome.

      As for the original builders and the locals – tantalising, isn’t it? There are so many clues, but so many huge gaps as well. (Frustrating in a way, but a great joy to those of us who like making things up.)



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